NCRI WOMEN'S COMMITTEE

Works extensively with Iranian women outside the country and maintains a permanent contact with women inside Iran. The Women’s Committee is actively involved with many women's rights organizations and NGO's and the Iranian diaspora. The committee is a major source of much of the information received from inside Iran with regards to women. Attending UN Human Rights Commission meetings and other international or regional conferences on women’s issues, and engaging in a relentless battle against the Iranian regime's misogyny are part of the activities of members and associates of the committee.

Famous Women

A study of Iran’s history reveals that women were able to break through different barriers and move forward

Benazir Bhutto was born on June 21, 1953, in Karachi in an educated family. She was the daughter of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, Pakistan's former prime minister. She studied at the universities of Karachi and Rawalpindi, and entered Harvard University in 1969.

For the first time 70 years ago, women received voting rights in France. Finland was also the first European country that gave this right to women in 1906.

Historical events and its perspectives:

Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi (Hindustani: [ˈɪnːdɪrə ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] )November, 16 1917 – October, 31 1984)  was the third Prime Minister of India and a central figure of the Indian National Congress party.

In 1942, Dr. Fatemeh Sayyah became Iran's First Female Professor when she was awarded the chair of Russian Language and Comparative Literature at Tehran University.

Algerian writer and filmmaker Assia Djebar passed away at the age of 78 in a hospital in Paris. Her body will be laid to rest in her coastal hometown of Sharshal near Algeria this week.

1788 United States (to stand for election)

1893 New Zealand (to vote)

1902 Australia 

1906 Finland

Iran's lady of poetry is no longer among us, but will be forever remembered through her beautiful poems depicting the pain of our people and country.

In memory of her we say: "Iran, our beautiful homeland which we will build once again."

Women in Tehran first entered politics during the reign of Naseraddin Shah when women participated in protests of the Tobacco movement. However, it was not until the constitutional revolution that women participated directly in political struggles.