NCRI WOMEN'S COMMITTEE

Works extensively with Iranian women outside the country and maintains a permanent contact with women inside Iran. The Women’s Committee is actively involved with many women's rights organizations and NGO's and the Iranian diaspora. The committee is a major source of much of the information received from inside Iran with regards to women. Attending UN Human Rights Commission meetings and other international or regional conferences on women’s issues, and engaging in a relentless battle against the Iranian regime's misogyny are part of the activities of members and associates of the committee.

Maryam Shariatmadari was sentenced to one year in jail on the charge of “encouraging corruption through removing her veil.”

The decree was issued on March 25, 2018, by the 2nd Criminal Court of Tehran Province.

Former political prisoner Nasrin Sotoudeh who is Ms. Shariatmadari’s lawyer emphasized that her client had been discriminated against by the Iranian regime’s Judiciary.

She said, “Ironically, the Judiciary ignored the case of a girl who had been sexually abused by her father, but surprisingly issues such heavy sentences for women who remove their scarves.”

Ms. Sotoudeh added, “I believe that the protests against the compulsory veil will not be subdued by such unusual decrees that do not comply with legal and judicial standards.”

Maryam Shariatmadari, 32, is a student of Computer Sciences at Tehran’s Amir Kabir University. She was pushed off a telecoms box by a State Security Force officer and hurt in the knee on February 23, 2018, when she was protesting the compulsory veiling by removing her shawl.

The Women’s Committee of the National Council of Resistance of Iran condemns any form of attack, brutalizing or hurting the women who oppose the compulsory veil. The Women’s Committee has also called for the immediate release of all women who have been arrested and imprisoned for improper veiling or removing their veil, and for protesting and opposing the compulsory veil and considers imprisonment verdicts for protesters against the compulsory veil as unjust.

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